THE BATTLE FOR SUPREMACY OVER THE SOUL OF THE COUNTRY CALLED NIGERIA:THE LAND LORD AND THE TENANT

Signatories to that statement asking Igbos to leave the north, deserve a cranium check after they’ve been arrested.

pulse.ng

Jun 7, 2017 1:00 PM

Sixteen groups under the aegis of the Coalition for Northern Youths (CNY) have issued a quit notice to Nigerians of Igbo extraction who reside and do business in the north.

President, Northern Emancipation Network, Abdul-azzez Suleima (left); President, Arewa Youth Consultative Forum, Shettima Yerima and North Central Coordinator, Arewa Citizens Action for Change, Mohammed Eneji Abdulhamid  (The Guardian )

“With the effective date of this declaration, which is today, Tuesday, June 06, 2017, all Igbo currently residing in any part of Northern Nigeria are hereby served notice to relocate within three months and all northerners residing in the East are advised likewise,” readMallam Abdulazeez Suleiman on behalf of the youth groups.

Such chutzpah.

The ultimatum was issued from the Arewa House in Kaduna and was signed among others by the Arewa Citizens Action for Change, Arewa Youth Consultative Forum, Arewa Youth Development Foundation, Arewa Students Forum and Northern Emancipation Network.

According to the Arewa youth, the ultimatum to the Igbos became necessary following the recent sit-at-home directive enforced in the east of Nigeria by secessionist groups like theIndigenous People Of Biafra (IPOB) and the Movement for the Actualization of the Sovereign State of Biafra (MASSOB).

IPOB and MASSOB often declare May 30 annually as a work and business free day to commemorate the declaration of a Biafra republic in 1967 by then Lieutenant Colonel Chukwuemeka Odumegwu-Ojukwu.

Ojukwu’s declaration led to a bloody civil war between Nigeria and pro-Biafra forces that lasted all of three years.

The Arewa youth are miffed that this year’s sit-at-home turned out a resounding success and are asking the Igbos to empty out of their territory as a consequence.

Parts of the statement from Arewa youth reads in part: “The persistence for the actualization of Biafra by the unruly Igbo of South-Eastern Nigeria has lately assumed another alarming twist which involved the forceful (sic) lockdown of activities and denial of other people right to free movement in the South-East by the rebel IPOB and its overt and covert sponsors.

“This latest action and similar confrontational conducts which amount to a brutal encroachment on the rights of those termed as non-indigenous people residing and doing lawful businesses in those areas illegally demarcated and defined as Biafra by the Igbo, are downright unacceptable and shall no longer be tolerated.

Colonel Odumegwu Emeka Ojukwu declaring the Independence of Biafra on May 30, 1967
Ojukwu declares the Biafra Republic in the ’60s  (Linda Ikeji )

“This is happening irrespective of the undisputable fact that Igbo have done and are doing more damage to our collective nationhood than any other ethnic group; being responsible for the first violent interference with democracy in Nigeria resulting in a prolonged counter-productive chain of military dictatorship.

“It is on record that since the inception of the current democratic dispensation, the Igbo have shown and maintained open contempt and resentment for the collective decision expressed by majority of Nigerians at various stages via generally acceptable democratic processes.

“The North hereby openly calls on the authorities and other national and international stakeholders to acknowledge this declaration by taking steps to facilitate the final dissolution of this hopeless union that has never been convenient to any of the parties.

“As a first step, since the Igbo have clearly abused the unreciprocated hospitality that gave them unrestricted access to, and ownership of landed properties all over the North, our first major move shall be to reclaim, assume and assert sole ownership and control of these landed resources currently owned, rented or in any way enjoyed by the ingrate Igbo in any part of Northern Nigeria.

Support for secession has increased since the arrest in late 2015 of Nnamdi Kanu, leader of the pro-independence Indigenous People of Biafra movement
Nnamdi Kanu  (AFP)

“We are hereby placing the Nigerian authorities and the entire nation on notice that as from the 1st October 2017, we shall commence the implementation of visible actions to prove to the whole world that we are no longer part of any federal union that should do with the Igbo”.

Who are these guys who think they can just wake up and order whole ethnic groups out of a section of the country?

To add salt to injury, MASSOB has welcomed the idea. The group has asked all Igbos doing business and residing in northern Nigeria to return home.

Wowsers!

Here goes:

“MASSOB gladly received the good news of quit notice order to the people of Biafra living in Arewa land. We pledge our total support towards this divinely approved quit notice. MASSOB congratulates the Arewa political, religious, and traditional and opinion leaders who sponsored their youth wing by using Arewa House in Kaduna for this greatest meeting of a coalition of Islamic fundamentalists”, MASSOB leader, Uchenna Madu, said.

Veterans of the civil war, wearing the red, green and black flag of the secessionist state of Biafra, attend ceremonies to mark the conflict's 50th anniversary
Igbo groups  (AFP)

“MASSOB is hereby advising the people of Biafra; mostly the Igbo living in Northern Nigeria (Arewa land) to take this quit notice serious (sic) as the plan to violently kill your children, wives and demolish your investments are already perfected”.

Holy shit!

What the heck did we just read?

It was a sickening way to commence my day and I’m still sick in the stomach from going through the statements and counter statements from purported representatives of both ethnic groups.

The point to be made here is that what we refer to as the ‘north’ of Nigeria isn’t even homogenous. There are different ethnic groups and tongues in what we call ‘north’ and the same applies to the Utopian Biafra. A bunch of signatories to a silly statement do not speak for hundreds of ethnic groups and minorities in both geopolitical zones.

Map of the federal republic of Nigeria  (Google)

However, like I wrote only last week, it has reached the point where we have to sit down and discuss the terms of our union as candidly as possible.

This discussion has got to have restructuring and resource control as the immediate targets to be met.

The center is too powerful as it stands and the various contending units of this union will continue to bay for blood just to get their hands on the national cake.

We can’t have a nation where a people still feel this genuinely aggrieved and hurt, 50 years after.

At the core of the agitations for secession is the failure of leadership and the erroneous soundbite from the ruling class that “the unity of the nation is non-negotiable”.

Everything in life is negotiable and Nigeria shouldn’t be an exception.

Acting president Osinbajo (center)  (Punch)

Nigeria has failed just about every ethnic group. Development indices in the core north are just as horrible as they are in the south. Minorities have been treated even worse by the state.

There are genuine grievances amongst the people who inhabit the geographical region called Nigeria—grievances the state has to address as soon as possible.

In the interim, the federal government has to realise that these inciting statements from groups in the north and south are capable of morphing into yet another round of crises or internecine skirmishes. Acting president Yemi Osinbajo has to deploy relevant organs of the federal government to nip doomsday in the bud.

Northern elders who have been vocal when it comes to discussing the struggle for power, have to distance themselves from what their young have put out and show greater restraint in heating up the polity.

Some northern politicians led by Shehu Sani  (Twitter)

The young men and women across the country who issue these banal statements should be made to realise that war is never a pleasant experience for anyone and that we stand to lose more if we head our separate ways.

Law enforcement should also not hesitate to pick up and interrogate members of these groups who fan embers of war at a whim.

We have a nation to build and Nigeria is relatively young.

On the road to nation building, mistakes will be made, there’ll be false starts here and there and millions will understandably lose faith in the union. Whether you choose to believe it or not, there’s enormous strength in our diversity and we should be proud that we aren’t a homogenous entity.

Learning from mistakes will be key and on no account must we resort to another war like we experienced in the ‘60s.

Shutting out hateful and inciting comments will be required, going forward.

Report a problem.

OBIO/AKPOR L.G.A.; THE PEOPLE, CULTURE AND POLITICAL SETTING

Obio-Akpor is one of the major cities of the Niger Delta, located in Rivers State. The local government area covers 260 km2 and at the 2006 Census held a population of 878,890. Its postal code or ZIP code is 500102. Obio-Akpor has its headquarters at Rumuodomaya. The original indigenous occupants of the area are the Ikwerre people.

Geography Edit

Obio-Akpor is bounded by Port Harcourt (local government area) to the south, Oyigbo to the east, Ikwerre to the north, and Emohua to the west. It is located between latitudes 4°45’N and 4°60’N and longitudes 6°50’E and 8°00’E.

Climate Edit
It lies in the tropical wet climate zone, characterized by abundant rainfall with little dry season. The monsoon season occurs between April and October, bringing heavy rainfall ranging from 2000 to 2500 mm with temperatures up to 25 °C and a relatively constant humidity.[2]

Geology and relief Edit
Covering around 100 sq mi, Obio-Akpor is generally a lowland area with average elevation below 30 metres above sea level. Its geology comprises basically of alluvial sedimentary basin and basement complex. The thick mangrove forest, raffia palms and light rainforest are the major types of vegetation. Due to high rainfall, the soil in the area is usually sandy or sandy loam. It is always leached, underlain by a layer of impervious pan.[2]

Localities, towns and suburbs Edit
The following localities, townships and suburbs, are within Obio-Akpor:

Alakahia
Atali
Awalama
Choba
Egbelu
Elelenwo
Eligbam
Elimgbu
Elioparanwo
Eliozu
Eneka
Iriebe
Mgbuesilaru
Mgbuoba
Mgbuosimini
Mpakurche
Nkpa
Nkpelu
Ogbogoro
Oginigba
Oro-Igwe
Oroazi
Ozuoba
Rukpokwu
Rumuadaolu
Rumuaghaolu
Rumuchiorlu
Rumudara
Rumudogo
Rumuekini
Rumuekwe
Rumueme
Rumuepirikom
Rumuesara
Rumuewhara
Rumuibekwe
Rumuigbo
Rumukalagbor
Rumunduru
Rumuobiokani
Rumuogba
Rumuokparali
Rumuokwurusi
Rumuolumeni
Rumuodomaya
Rumuoji
Rumuokoro
Rumuokwu
Rumuokwachi
Rumuokwuota
Rumuokwurusi
Rumuola
Rumuolukwu
Rumuomasi
Rumuomoi
Rumuosi
Rumuoto
Rumurolu
Rumuwaji
Rumuwegwu
Trans Amadi
Woji
Government Edit

Obio-Akpor is one of the 8 local government areas that formed the Rivers East senatorial district. It consists of 17 electoral wards administered by the Obio-Akpor Local Government Council. The council comprises the chairman who is the chief executive of the local government area, and other elected members who are referred to as councillors. The chairman is normally elected, but can, under special circumstances, also be appointed. He or she has the duty to supervise the activities of the local government, and preside over all meetings of the council.

Wards Edit
Choba (ward)
Elelenwo (3b)
Oro-Igwe (ward)
Ozuoba-Ogbogoro
Rukpokwu (ward)
Rumueme (7a)
Rumueme (7b)
Rumueme (7c)
Rumuigbo (8a)
Rumukwuta (8b)
Rumuodara (ward)
Rumuodomaya (3a)
Rumuokoro (ward)
Rumuokwu (2b)
Rumuolumeni (ward)
Rumuomasi (ward)
Woji (ward)
Chairmen Edit
To date, only 7 individuals have served as chairman of Obio-Akpor local government council. The list below does not include persons who have served as either a caretaker committee chairman or an administrator. For that information, see list of chairmen and caretaker committee chairmen of Obio-Akpor.

List of chairmen:

# Name Position Took office Left office Comments
1 B.A. Worgu chairman May 1989 July 1989 Engineer
2 Ndumati Lawson Ndu chairman January 1991 June 1991 Chief
3 O.T. Weli chairman July 1991 June 1993 Engineer
4 L.W. Chukwu chairman April 1995 April 1996 JP
5 Freddy N.W. Ichegbo chairman April 1996 April 1997 Hon.
6 Ezenwo Nyesom Wike chairman 1999 2002 Chief Barr.
7 Ezenwo Nyesom Wike chairman April 2004 June 2007 Chief Barr.
8 Timothy E. Nsirim chairman April 2008 April 2011
9 Timothy E. Nsirim chairman May 2011 November 2013 Hon.
Education

Media

Notable people Edit

Ezenwo Nyesom Wike, Governor of Rivers State.
Duncan Mighty (born 1983), Musician.
Chief Edward Woherem,(JP) 1928 – 2013, Real Estate Development.
Dr. Evans Woherem (Born 1958), Former First Bank Executive Director, CEO Compumetrics Nigeria Limited. I.T Consultant.
OCJ Okocha, SAN, MFR, JP
Obi Wali, PhD, former distinguished senator, writer, activist
Frank Eke, former Deputy Governor of Rivers State, Eze Gbakagbaka of Ikwerre II
John Azuta-Mbata, politician
Monalisa Chinda, actress
Tonto Dike, actress
Daisy W. Okocha, former Chief Judge of Rivers State
Okey Wali, SAN, former president of the Niger

IKWERRE PEOPLE OF RIVERS STATE

Ikwerre people of River State is one of major ethnic group in Nigeria . They are a subgroup of the Igbo people , [3] although a small minority for political expediency now dispute this account, claiming their history was rewritten during the colonial period because of the dominance of the larger Igbo group.
The Ikwerre are said to be related or share common ancestry with the Ogba and Ekpeye people (Akalaka brothers). [ citation needed] They trace their origins to Owerri , Ohaji , Etche , and Ngwa areas of Igboland. They constitute the majority of Rivers state, although there are other populations in neighboring states. The Ikwerre speak the Ikwerre dialect , a dialect part of the many diverse Igbo dialects, [4] and are predominantly settled in the Ikwerre, Obio-Akpor , Port Harcourt and Emohua local government areas. They are traditionally farmers, fishermen and hunters, but in recent times, the environmental degradation and urban sprawl associated with oil exploration and exploitation has caused a sharp decline in the amount of farmland, forests and rivers available for their traditional occupations. [citation needed]
The Ikwerre exist in well-delineated clans, with each clan having its own Paramount Ruler, therefore, the Ikwerre do not have an overall paramount ruler or King, but designated kings/ruler/leader mostly approved by its constituents. Although all paramount rulers in ikwerre are united in what is known as Ogbakor Ikwerre which is an association of Ikwerre traditional rulers. [citation needed] A total of 92 oil wells, producing an estimated 100,000 barrels of crude daily, are located in Ikwerreland. The Ikwerre therefore play host to several multinational oil-producing and servicing companies, in addition to many other industries and establishments. [citation needed] Despite these, the Ikwerre, like nearly all other minorities of the Niger Delta, frequently complain of marginalisation by the oil operatives. The University of Port Harcourt , the Rivers State University of Science and Technology , the three campuses of the Rivers State College of Education, as well as the Rivers State College of Arts and Science, are all sited on Ikwerreland. [citation needed]

Origin The Ikwerre are considered by a great majority of scholars as a subgroup of the Igbo people of southeastern Nigeria .

There are several theories over the origin, and the strongest and most widely accepted one is the theory linking the Ikwerre to an Igbo origin. [5] They would be descendents from an Igbo migration from Awka and Orlu areas towards South. Igbo scholars take Ikwerre as part of the Southern Igbo.

Amadi, an Ikwerre scholar, says that the Igbo origin theory has some support even inside Ikwerre themselves, with Ikwerre would be descendants of a migration of Arochukwu Igbo, with Okpo Nwagidi being the leader of the Ikwerre tribe. Before the civil war, there had been dissident voices that claimed that Ikwerre could have migrated from Owerri , Ohaji, Ngwa, and Etche areas of Igboland. [5] But when Port Harcourt was conquered by Nigeria during the Biafran War and the Igbo people from other parts of Igboland fled the territory, a UN report says that the Ikwerre decided to claim that the Ikwerre were non-Igbo for convenience. [6] The Ikwerre are recognized officially as a separate group in the 1979 Nigerian Constitution. [5]

Notable people Some notable people of Ikwerre origin: Elechi Amadi, writer[citation needed] Emmanuel Onunwor , former Mayor of East Cleveland , Ohio, USA [citation needed] Chibuike Amaechi , former Governor of Rivers State Obi Wali , Writer, Politician and Minority rights activist [citation needed ] Tonto Dikeh, Actress, Musician Celestine Omehia,former Governor of Rivers State Monalisa Chinda , Actress Duncan Mighty, Musician Ezenwo Nyesom Wike, Current Governor of Rivers State Hon. O.K Chinda, Politician Bobby Ogoloma , Actor
The Ikwerre (also spelt Ikwere) are one of the many native ethnic groups in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria . They are a subgroup of the Igbo people , [1][2] [3] although a small minority for political expediency now dispute this account, claiming their history was rewritten during the colonial period because of the dominance of the larger Igbo group. The Ikwerre are said to be related or share common ancestry with the Ogba and Ekpeye people (Akalaka brothers). [ citation needed] They trace their origins to Owerri , Ohaji , Etche , and Ngwa areas of Igboland. They constitute the majority of Rivers state, although there are other populations in neighboring states. The Ikwerre speak the Ikwerre dialect , a dialect part of the many diverse Igbo dialects, [4] and are predominantly settled in the Ikwerre, Obio-Akpor , Port Harcourt and Emohua local government areas. They are traditionally farmers, fishermen and hunters, but in recent times, the environmental degradation and urban sprawl associated with oil exploration and exploitation has caused a sharp decline in the amount of farmland, forests and rivers available for their traditional occupations. [citation needed] The Ikwerre exist in well-delineated clans, with each clan having its own Paramount Ruler, therefore, the Ikwerre do not have an overall paramount ruler or King, but designated kings/ruler/leader mostly approved by its constituents. Although all paramount rulers in ikwerre are united in what is known as Ogbakor Ikwerre which is an association of Ikwerre traditional rulers. [citation needed] A total of 92 oil wells, producing an estimated 100,000 barrels of crude daily, are located in Ikwerreland. The Ikwerre therefore play host to several multinational oil-producing and servicing companies, in addition to many other industries and establishments. [citation needed] Despite these, the Ikwerre, like nearly all other minorities of the Niger Delta, frequently complain of marginalisation by the oil operatives. The University of Port Harcourt , the Rivers State University of Science and Technology , the three campuses of the Rivers State College of Education, as well as the Rivers State College of Arts and Science, are all sited on Ikwerreland. [citation needed] Origin The Ikwerre are considered by a great majority of scholars as a subgroup of the Igbo people of southeastern Nigeria , [1][2][3] There are several theories over the origin, and the strongest and most widely accepted one is the theory linking the Ikwerre to an Igbo origin. [5] They would be descendents from an Igbo migration from Awka and Orlu areas towards South. Igbo scholars take Ikwerre as part of the Southern Igbo. Amadi, an Ikwerre scholar, says that the Igbo origin theory has some support even inside Ikwerre themselves, with Ikwerre would be descendants of a migration of Arochukwu Igbo, with Okpo Nwagidi being the leader of the Ikwerre tribe. Before the civil war, there had been dissident voices that claimed that Ikwerre could have migrated from Owerri , Ohaji, Ngwa, and Etche areas of Igboland. [5] But when Port Harcourt was conquered by Nigeria during the Biafran War and the Igbo people from other parts of Igboland fled the territory, a UN report says that the Ikwerre decided to claim that the Ikwerre were non-Igbo for convenience. [6] The Ikwerre are recognized officially as a separate group in the 1979 Nigerian Constitution. [5] Notable people Some notable people of Ikwerre origin: Elechi Amadi, writer[citation needed] Emmanuel Onunwor , former Mayor of East Cleveland , Ohio, USA [citation needed] Chibuike Amaechi , former Governor of Rivers State Obi Wali , Writer, Politician and Minority rights activist [citation needed ] Tonto Dikeh, Actress, Musician Celestine Omehia,former Governor of Rivers State Monalisa Chinda , Actress Duncan Mighty, Musician Ezenwo Nyesom Wike, Current Governor of Rivers State Hon. O.K Chinda, Politician Bobby Ogoloma , Actor
The Ikwerre (also spelt Ikwere) are one of the many native ethnic groups in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria . They are a subgroup of the Igbo people , [1][2] [3] although a small minority for political expediency now dispute this account, claiming their history was rewritten during the colonial period because of the dominance of the larger Igbo group. The Ikwerre are said to be related or share common ancestry with the Ogba and Ekpeye people (Akalaka brothers). [ citation needed] They trace their origins to Owerri , Ohaji , Etche , and Ngwa areas of Igboland. They constitute the majority of Rivers state, although there are other populations in neighboring states. The Ikwerre speak the Ikwerre dialect , a dialect part of the many diverse Igbo dialects, [4] and are predominantly settled in the Ikwerre, Obio-Akpor , Port Harcourt and Emohua local government areas. They are traditionally farmers, fishermen and hunters, but in recent times, the environmental degradation and urban sprawl associated with oil exploration and exploitation has caused a sharp decline in the amount of farmland, forests and rivers available for their traditional occupations. [citation needed] The Ikwerre exist in well-delineated clans, with each clan having its own Paramount Ruler, therefore, the Ikwerre do not have an overall paramount ruler or King, but designated kings/ruler/leader mostly approved by its constituents. Although all paramount rulers in ikwerre are united in what is known as Ogbakor Ikwerre which is an association of Ikwerre traditional rulers. [citation needed] A total of 92 oil wells, producing an estimated 100,000 barrels of crude daily, are located in Ikwerreland. The Ikwerre therefore play host to several multinational oil-producing and servicing companies, in addition to many other industries and establishments. [citation needed] Despite these, the Ikwerre, like nearly all other minorities of the Niger Delta, frequently complain of marginalisation by the oil operatives. The University of Port Harcourt , the Rivers State University of Science and Technology , the three campuses of the Rivers State College of Education, as well as the Rivers State College of Arts and Science, are all sited on Ikwerreland. [citation needed] Origin The Ikwerre are considered by a great majority of scholars as a subgroup of the Igbo people of southeastern Nigeria , [1][2][3] There are several theories over the origin, and the strongest and most widely accepted one is the theory linking the Ikwerre to an Igbo origin. [5] They would be descendents from an Igbo migration from Awka and Orlu areas towards South. Igbo scholars take Ikwerre as part of the Southern Igbo. Amadi, an Ikwerre scholar, says that the Igbo origin theory has some support even inside Ikwerre themselves, with Ikwerre would be descendants of a migration of Arochukwu Igbo, with Okpo Nwagidi being the leader of the Ikwerre tribe. Before the civil war, there had been dissident voices that claimed that Ikwerre could have migrated from Owerri , Ohaji, Ngwa, and Etche areas of Igboland. [5] But when Port Harcourt was conquered by Nigeria during the Biafran War and the Igbo people from other parts of Igboland fled the territory, a UN report says that the Ikwerre decided to claim that the Ikwerre were non-Igbo for convenience. [6] The Ikwerre are recognized officially as a separate group in the 1979 Nigerian Constitution. [5] Notable people Some notable people of Ikwerre origin: Elechi Amadi, writer[citation needed] Emmanuel Onunwor , former Mayor of East Cleveland , Ohio, USA [citation needed] Chibuike Amaechi , former Governor of Rivers State Obi Wali , Writer, Politician and Minority rights activist [citation needed ] Tonto Dikeh, Actress, Musician Celestine Omehia,former Governor of Rivers State Monalisa Chinda , Actress Duncan Mighty, Musician Ezenwo Nyesom Wike, Current Governor of Rivers State Hon. O.K Chinda, Politician Bobby Ogoloma , Actor
Re: Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by ariesbull: 10:13am On Feb 08, 2016
Ikwerre are igbo hopeathand hopeathand knows this

Ezepromoe knows it..amaechi the Judas of ubima and betrayer of southern tribes know this
So next story pls
1 Like
Re: Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by StunningCEO: 10:36am On Feb 08, 2016
Ikwerre people are not ibos and have never been ibos….you people need to allow these people be themselves….it is getting irritating… angry angry angry
2 Likes
Re: Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by Mckennedy: 11:00am On Feb 08, 2016
StunningCEO:
Ikwerre people are not ibos and have never been ibos….you people need to allow these people be themselves….it is getting irritating… angry angry angry

Tell us what you know about ikwerre’s? or shut your mouth and write no more.
Re: Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by DerKaiser: 11:09am On Feb 08, 2016
StunningCEO:
Ikwerre people are not ibos and have never been ibos….you people need to allow these people be themselves….it is getting irritating… angry angry angry

No they are binis or better still yorubas.

Some of you irritants would sit in your hell holes and attempt to define others.

While the Ikwerres are largely insignificant to the greater Igbo cause and advancement, they are still nothing but complete Igbos albeit highly confused ones.

If they are not Igbo then they have no business speaking Igbo language, having first, middle and family Igbo names and practising the Igbo tradition and culture.

The things I listed above are the fundamental aspects of defining a people and to where they belong.

Anyway I doubt if you have ever met an Ikwerre in your entire existence. Keep making fools out of yourselves online attempting to create baseless theories.

You people are lost and the thought of Igbos would torment y’all to extinction.

Unfortunately for you, Igbos are extremely difficult to get rid of or wish away.

Brace yourself because your pain would last for generations.
2 Likes 1 Share
Re: Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by StunningCEO: 11:36am On Feb 08, 2016
That you speak English….bear English names and go to church on Sundays….does not make you English….. angry angry angry
2 Likes 1 Share
Re: Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by Udmaster(m): 11:39am On Feb 08, 2016
I am proudly IGBO, it is high time this ikwerre

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Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by mordsith: 10:10am On Feb 08, 2016
The Ikwerre (also spelt Ikwere) are one of the many native ethnic groups in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria . They are a subgroup of the Igbo people , [3] although a small minority for political expediency now dispute this account, claiming their history was rewritten during the colonial period because of the dominance of the larger Igbo group.
The Ikwerre are said to be related or share common ancestry with the Ogba and Ekpeye people (Akalaka brothers). [ citation needed] They trace their origins to Owerri , Ohaji , Etche , and Ngwa areas of Igboland. They constitute the majority of Rivers state, although there are other populations in neighboring states. The Ikwerre speak the Ikwerre dialect , a dialect part of the many diverse Igbo dialects, [4] and are predominantly settled in the Ikwerre, Obio-Akpor , Port Harcourt and Emohua local government areas. They are traditionally farmers, fishermen and hunters, but in recent times, the environmental degradation and urban sprawl associated with oil exploration and exploitation has caused a sharp decline in the amount of farmland, forests and rivers available for their traditional occupations. [citation needed]
The Ikwerre exist in well-delineated clans, with each clan having its own Paramount Ruler, therefore, the Ikwerre do not have an overall paramount ruler or King, but designated kings/ruler/leader mostly approved by its constituents. Although all paramount rulers in ikwerre are united in what is known as Ogbakor Ikwerre which is an association of Ikwerre traditional rulers. [citation needed] A total of 92 oil wells, producing an estimated 100,000 barrels of crude daily, are located in Ikwerreland. The Ikwerre therefore play host to several multinational oil-producing and servicing companies, in addition to many other industries and establishments. [citation needed] Despite these, the Ikwerre, like nearly all other minorities of the Niger Delta, frequently complain of marginalisation by the oil operatives. The University of Port Harcourt , the Rivers State University of Science and Technology , the three campuses of the Rivers State College of Education, as well as the Rivers State College of Arts and Science, are all sited on Ikwerreland. [citation needed]

Origin The Ikwerre are considered by a great majority of scholars as a subgroup of the Igbo people of southeastern Nigeria .

There are several theories over the origin, and the strongest and most widely accepted one is the theory linking the Ikwerre to an Igbo origin. [5] They would be descendents from an Igbo migration from Awka and Orlu areas towards South. Igbo scholars take Ikwerre as part of the Southern Igbo.

Amadi, an Ikwerre scholar, says that the Igbo origin theory has some support even inside Ikwerre themselves, with Ikwerre would be descendants of a migration of Arochukwu Igbo, with Okpo Nwagidi being the leader of the Ikwerre tribe. Before the civil war, there had been dissident voices that claimed that Ikwerre could have migrated from Owerri , Ohaji, Ngwa, and Etche areas of Igboland. [5] But when Port Harcourt was conquered by Nigeria during the Biafran War and the Igbo people from other parts of Igboland fled the territory, a UN report says that the Ikwerre decided to claim that the Ikwerre were non-Igbo for convenience. [6] The Ikwerre are recognized officially as a separate group in the 1979 Nigerian Constitution. [5]

Notable people Some notable people of Ikwerre origin: Elechi Amadi, writer[citation needed] Emmanuel Onunwor , former Mayor of East Cleveland , Ohio, USA [citation needed] Chibuike Amaechi , former Governor of Rivers State Obi Wali , Writer, Politician and Minority rights activist [citation needed ] Tonto Dikeh, Actress, Musician Celestine Omehia,former Governor of Rivers State Monalisa Chinda , Actress Duncan Mighty, Musician Ezenwo Nyesom Wike, Current Governor of Rivers State Hon. O.K Chinda, Politician Bobby Ogoloma , Actor
The Ikwerre (also spelt Ikwere) are one of the many native ethnic groups in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria . They are a subgroup of the Igbo people , [1][2] [3] although a small minority for political expediency now dispute this account, claiming their history was rewritten during the colonial period because of the dominance of the larger Igbo group. The Ikwerre are said to be related or share common ancestry with the Ogba and Ekpeye people (Akalaka brothers). [ citation needed] They trace their origins to Owerri , Ohaji , Etche , and Ngwa areas of Igboland. They constitute the majority of Rivers state, although there are other populations in neighboring states. The Ikwerre speak the Ikwerre dialect , a dialect part of the many diverse Igbo dialects, [4] and are predominantly settled in the Ikwerre, Obio-Akpor , Port Harcourt and Emohua local government areas. They are traditionally farmers, fishermen and hunters, but in recent times, the environmental degradation and urban sprawl associated with oil exploration and exploitation has caused a sharp decline in the amount of farmland, forests and rivers available for their traditional occupations. [citation needed] The Ikwerre exist in well-delineated clans, with each clan having its own Paramount Ruler, therefore, the Ikwerre do not have an overall paramount ruler or King, but designated kings/ruler/leader mostly approved by its constituents. Although all paramount rulers in ikwerre are united in what is known as Ogbakor Ikwerre which is an association of Ikwerre traditional rulers. [citation needed] A total of 92 oil wells, producing an estimated 100,000 barrels of crude daily, are located in Ikwerreland. The Ikwerre therefore play host to several multinational oil-producing and servicing companies, in addition to many other industries and establishments. [citation needed] Despite these, the Ikwerre, like nearly all other minorities of the Niger Delta, frequently complain of marginalisation by the oil operatives. The University of Port Harcourt , the Rivers State University of Science and Technology , the three campuses of the Rivers State College of Education, as well as the Rivers State College of Arts and Science, are all sited on Ikwerreland. [citation needed] Origin The Ikwerre are considered by a great majority of scholars as a subgroup of the Igbo people of southeastern Nigeria , [1][2][3] There are several theories over the origin, and the strongest and most widely accepted one is the theory linking the Ikwerre to an Igbo origin. [5] They would be descendents from an Igbo migration from Awka and Orlu areas towards South. Igbo scholars take Ikwerre as part of the Southern Igbo. Amadi, an Ikwerre scholar, says that the Igbo origin theory has some support even inside Ikwerre themselves, with Ikwerre would be descendants of a migration of Arochukwu Igbo, with Okpo Nwagidi being the leader of the Ikwerre tribe. Before the civil war, there had been dissident voices that claimed that Ikwerre could have migrated from Owerri , Ohaji, Ngwa, and Etche areas of Igboland. [5] But when Port Harcourt was conquered by Nigeria during the Biafran War and the Igbo people from other parts of Igboland fled the territory, a UN report says that the Ikwerre decided to claim that the Ikwerre were non-Igbo for convenience. [6] The Ikwerre are recognized officially as a separate group in the 1979 Nigerian Constitution. [5] Notable people Some notable people of Ikwerre origin: Elechi Amadi, writer[citation needed] Emmanuel Onunwor , former Mayor of East Cleveland , Ohio, USA [citation needed] Chibuike Amaechi , former Governor of Rivers State Obi Wali , Writer, Politician and Minority rights activist [citation needed ] Tonto Dikeh, Actress, Musician Celestine Omehia,former Governor of Rivers State Monalisa Chinda , Actress Duncan Mighty, Musician Ezenwo Nyesom Wike, Current Governor of Rivers State Hon. O.K Chinda, Politician Bobby Ogoloma , Actor
The Ikwerre (also spelt Ikwere) are one of the many native ethnic groups in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria . They are a subgroup of the Igbo people , [1][2] [3] although a small minority for political expediency now dispute this account, claiming their history was rewritten during the colonial period because of the dominance of the larger Igbo group. The Ikwerre are said to be related or share common ancestry with the Ogba and Ekpeye people (Akalaka brothers). [ citation needed] They trace their origins to Owerri , Ohaji , Etche , and Ngwa areas of Igboland. They constitute the majority of Rivers state, although there are other populations in neighboring states. The Ikwerre speak the Ikwerre dialect , a dialect part of the many diverse Igbo dialects, [4] and are predominantly settled in the Ikwerre, Obio-Akpor , Port Harcourt and Emohua local government areas. They are traditionally farmers, fishermen and hunters, but in recent times, the environmental degradation and urban sprawl associated with oil exploration and exploitation has caused a sharp decline in the amount of farmland, forests and rivers available for their traditional occupations. [citation needed] The Ikwerre exist in well-delineated clans, with each clan having its own Paramount Ruler, therefore, the Ikwerre do not have an overall paramount ruler or King, but designated kings/ruler/leader mostly approved by its constituents. Although all paramount rulers in ikwerre are united in what is known as Ogbakor Ikwerre which is an association of Ikwerre traditional rulers. [citation needed] A total of 92 oil wells, producing an estimated 100,000 barrels of crude daily, are located in Ikwerreland. The Ikwerre therefore play host to several multinational oil-producing and servicing companies, in addition to many other industries and establishments. [citation needed] Despite these, the Ikwerre, like nearly all other minorities of the Niger Delta, frequently complain of marginalisation by the oil operatives. The University of Port Harcourt , the Rivers State University of Science and Technology , the three campuses of the Rivers State College of Education, as well as the Rivers State College of Arts and Science, are all sited on Ikwerreland. [citation needed] Origin The Ikwerre are considered by a great majority of scholars as a subgroup of the Igbo people of southeastern Nigeria , [1][2][3] There are several theories over the origin, and the strongest and most widely accepted one is the theory linking the Ikwerre to an Igbo origin. [5] They would be descendents from an Igbo migration from Awka and Orlu areas towards South. Igbo scholars take Ikwerre as part of the Southern Igbo. Amadi, an Ikwerre scholar, says that the Igbo origin theory has some support even inside Ikwerre themselves, with Ikwerre would be descendants of a migration of Arochukwu Igbo, with Okpo Nwagidi being the leader of the Ikwerre tribe. Before the civil war, there had been dissident voices that claimed that Ikwerre could have migrated from Owerri , Ohaji, Ngwa, and Etche areas of Igboland. [5] But when Port Harcourt was conquered by Nigeria during the Biafran War and the Igbo people from other parts of Igboland fled the territory, a UN report says that the Ikwerre decided to claim that the Ikwerre were non-Igbo for convenience. [6] The Ikwerre are recognized officially as a separate group in the 1979 Nigerian Constitution. [5] Notable people Some notable people of Ikwerre origin: Elechi Amadi, writer[citation needed] Emmanuel Onunwor , former Mayor of East Cleveland , Ohio, USA [citation needed] Chibuike Amaechi , former Governor of Rivers State Obi Wali , Writer, Politician and Minority rights activist [citation needed ] Tonto Dikeh, Actress, Musician Celestine Omehia,former Governor of Rivers State Monalisa Chinda , Actress Duncan Mighty, Musician Ezenwo Nyesom Wike, Current Governor of Rivers State Hon. O.K Chinda, Politician Bobby Ogoloma , Actor
Re: Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by ariesbull: 10:13am On Feb 08, 2016
Ikwerre are igbo hopeathand hopeathand knows this

Ezepromoe knows it..amaechi the Judas of ubima and betrayer of southern tribes know this
So next story pls
1 Like
Re: Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by StunningCEO: 10:36am On Feb 08, 2016
Ikwerre people are not ibos and have never been ibos….you people need to allow these people be themselves….it is getting irritating… angry angry angry
2 Likes
Re: Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by Mckennedy: 11:00am On Feb 08, 2016
StunningCEO:
Ikwerre people are not ibos and have never been ibos….you people need to allow these people be themselves….it is getting irritating… angry angry angry

Tell us what you know about ikwerre’s? or shut your mouth and write no more.
Re: Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by DerKaiser: 11:09am On Feb 08, 2016
StunningCEO:
Ikwerre people are not ibos and have never been ibos….you people need to allow these people be themselves….it is getting irritating… angry angry angry

No they are binis or better still yorubas.

Some of you irritants would sit in your hell holes and attempt to define others.

While the Ikwerres are largely insignificant to the greater Igbo cause and advancement, they are still nothing but complete Igbos albeit highly confused ones.

If they are not Igbo then they have no business speaking Igbo language, having first, middle and family Igbo names and practising the Igbo tradition and culture.

The things I listed above are the fundamental aspects of defining a people and to where they belong.

Anyway I doubt if you have ever met an Ikwerre in your entire existence. Keep making fools out of yourselves online attempting to create baseless theories.

You people are lost and the thought of Igbos would torment y’all to extinction.

Unfortunately for you, Igbos are extremely difficult to get rid of or wish away.

Brace yourself because your pain would last for generations.
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Re: Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by StunningCEO: 11:36am On Feb 08, 2016
That you speak English….bear English names and go to church on Sundays….does not make you English….. angry angry angry
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Re: Ikwerre People Of Rivers State by Udmaster(m): 11:39am On Feb 08, 2016
I am proudly IGBO, it is high time this ikwerre